There are two things common between the websites in these screenshots that I took yesterday.

  1. They are beautifully designed, with great typography, clear branding, all optimized for readability.
  2. I had to install Firefox, Adblock Plus and uBlock Origin, as well as manually select and remove additional elements such as subscription overlays.

The web can be beautiful. Except it’s not right now.

Tweaking some more

January 25th, 2020

It certainly feels like this little web garden of mine is not quite done yet. Just a few short months ago I wrote about converting interviews to use immersive, full-bleed images. This is how it looked like back then:

Ever since I’ve been tweaking the custom layout of the intro section that combines the hero image, the title block and the name of this site (that leads to the main landing page):

Now this combined section starts right at the top, and layers all the textual elements along the horizontal edges of the hero image. It brings together all of these elements in a single, unified, cohesive space. And it also gives extra vertical space to the interview introduction to be visible above the fold. This particular journey started in May 2019, and it might just be getting close to its conclusion. Onwards to the next chapter!

Radiance comes with a number of sample / demo apps that showcase the flexibility and power of its APIs. One of those demos is Lumen. Its main goal is to highlight the feature set of the Trident animation library. Lumen uses MusicBrainz JSON web service to search for all albums of the specific artist, and for the list of tracks on individual albums. Sending requests and parsing responses is done with Retrofit and Moshi. Lucent is the port of Lumen to Kotlin.

Let’s see how it works together in Kotlin.

We start by adding the build dependencies on Retrofit and Moshi:

dependencies {
    implementation "com.squareup.retrofit2:retrofit:2.9.0"
    implementation "com.squareup.retrofit2:converter-moshi:2.9.0"
}

Next, we define our service interface that maps to MusicBrainz APIs:


    private interface MusicBrainzService {
        @GET("/ws/2/release?type=album&fmt=json")
        fun getReleases(@Query("artist") artistId: String): Call

        @GET("/ws/2/release/{release}?inc=recordings&fmt=json")
        fun getRelease(@Path("release") releaseId: String): Call

        companion object {
            const val API_URL = "https://musicbrainz.org/"
        }
    }

Note the usage of fmt=json attribute in all @GET functions, and usage of @Query and @Path that matches the expected endpoint contracts.

The data classes map to the matching MusicBrainz entities, using @field:Json annotation with the matching name attribute, along with @Json annotation on one of the data classes to properly map it to the matching JSON tags:


data class SearchResultRelease(
        @field:Json(name = "id") val id: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "title") val title: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "artist") var artist: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "date") val date: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "release-events") val releaseEvents: List,
        @field:Json(name = "asin") val asin: String?)

data class Area(
        @field:Json(name = "disambiguation") val disambiguation: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "id") val id: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "name") var name: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "sort-name") val sortName: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "iso-3166-1-codes") val iso31661Codes: List)

data class Medium(
        @field:Json(name = "tracks") val tracks: List)

data class Release(
        @field:Json(name = "id") val id: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "title") val title: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "date") val date: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "media") val media: List,
        @field:Json(name = "asin") val asin: String?)

data class ReleaseEvent(
        @field:Json(name = "date") val date: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "area") val area: Area?)

@Json(name = "release-list")
data class ReleaseList(
        @field:Json(name = "count") val count: Int?,
        @field:Json(name = "releases") val releases: List)

data class Track(
        @field:Json(name = "title") val title: String?,
        @field:Json(name = "length") val length: Int?)

Now we can create a Retrofit object and fire off our request:


        val retrofit = Retrofit.Builder()
                .baseUrl(MusicBrainzService.API_URL)
                .client(getHttpClient())
                .addConverterFactory(MoshiConverterFactory.create())
                .build()

        val service = retrofit.create(MusicBrainzService::class.java)

        val releaseResponse = service.getReleases(artistId).execute()
        val releases = releaseResponse.body()

And to get the list of tracks for the specific album:


    fun doTrackSearch(releaseId: String): List {
        val retrofit = Retrofit.Builder()
                .baseUrl(MusicBrainzService.API_URL)
                .client(getHttpClient())
                .addConverterFactory(MoshiConverterFactory.create())
                .build()

        val service = retrofit.create(MusicBrainzService::class.java)

        val releaseResponse = service.getRelease(releaseId).execute()
        val release = releaseResponse.body()

        return release!!.media[0].tracks
    }

Where the OkHttpClient is configured like this:


    private fun getHttpClient(): OkHttpClient {
        val okHttpBuilder = OkHttpClient.Builder()
        okHttpBuilder.addInterceptor { chain ->
            val requestWithUserAgent = chain.request().newBuilder()
                    .header("User-Agent", "My custom user agent")
                    .build()
            chain.proceed(requestWithUserAgent)
        }
        return okHttpBuilder.build()
    }

This is it. No messy handling of HTTP requests, no manual parsing of JSON responses. All driven by metadata and encapsulated by Kotlin data classes.

Just one more thing for 2019

October 28th, 2019

One last thing I wanted to do with hero images for interviews. Now on larger (desktop / laptop sized) screens the interview title blurb is displayed on top of a translucent scrim along the bottom edge of the hero image. Maybe now I’m done for 2019…